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  • Posted by ACTION Guest on Mar 27, 2017  | 

    The reality is that tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne disease; anyone can contract it. Read about her firsthand experienced with TB when she was diagnosed with TB in 2011 and drug-resistant TB in 2012 and her efforts to call attention to the prevalence of TB that causes so much suffering in her home country, South Africa. Read more

  • Ending the TB Epidemic Waiswa Nkwanga

    Fight TB through education

    Posted by Waiswa Nkwanga on Mar 24, 2017  | 

    When people in West Africa started dying from Ebola, communities had no idea what was killing them. People resorted to rumors and allegations of foul play, such as the damaging claim that Westerners created the virus to combat population growth. This only exacerbated the problem and fueled stigma against those affected by the disease. It was a classic example of the fallout from weak public health institutions and a lack of education around the health threats that the region faced. Read more

  • Posted by ACTION Secretariat, Washington, D.C. on Jan 26, 2017  | 

    The World Economic Forum bills its annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, as the "foremost creative force for engaging the world’s top private sector leaders in collaborative activities to shape the global, regional and industry agendas." The Forum’s mission, improving the state of the world, has typically focused on various aspects of private sector led macro-economic growth. Read more

  • Ending the TB EpidemicInvesting in NutritionThe Power of Vaccines Grace Virtue, Ph.D.

    Extreme poverty in Haiti: Why we must do more to end it

    Posted by Grace Virtue, Ph.D. on Jan 23, 2017  | 

    Throughout the world, particularly in the Global South, millions of people begin each day struggling with how to satisfy their most basic needs. Where to get food or water. Making do with non-existent or communal sanitary facilities. Limited or no access to dental or medical care. High exposure to contagious diseases. The constant threat of conflict or disasters — which is never far removed from situations of extreme poverty. Read more

  • Posted by RESULTS Australia on Dec 06, 2016  | 

    Of the many issues relevant to international development and poverty reduction, which would you rank as being the most important? According to Dr Jim Kim, World Bank President, the biggest single issue in development is that one in four children suffer from stunting (being well below average height for their age), an indicator of chronic malnutrition among children. Read more

  • Posted by Grace Virtue, Ph.D. on Dec 01, 2016  | 

    World AIDS Day, observed December 1st, is an opportunity both to call attention to the continuing challenges to end infections globally, and in the case of Haiti, to shed new light on the link between poverty, the prevalence of HIV/AIDS and other diseases, and the need for deep and coordinated efforts across the issues. Read more

  • Posted by Waiswa Nkwanga on Dec 01, 2016  | 

    I attended the International AIDS Conference this year. International HIV/AIDS activist Charlize Theron caught my attention with her comments at the opening ceremony. “I am sad to be here at the 21st International AIDS Conference,” she said. “This is the second time my home country of South Africa has hosted…We shouldn’t have had to host this conference again.” This World AIDS Day, let us pledge to focus more on creating health systems and infrastructure so that when it comes to global health, we go beyond just responding when pandemics occur to actually preventing them in the first place. Read more

  • Ending the TB Epidemic

    Re-energizing HIV Prevention

    Posted by ACTION Guest on Nov 30, 2016  | 

    In a World AIDS Day blog post, the Global Fund's Mark Dybul writes that "[a]n indispensable element of our efforts to end HIV as an epidemic — prevention — is lagging too far behind." While an impressive 18 million people are now on HIV treatment, "to end HIV as an epidemic, we must re-energize the HIV movement with a comprehensive approach that includes medical prevention methods and," he argues, must "address cultural and structural factors that put people at risk and undermine access to services." Read more